How to make Google Chrome run faster

February 6th, 2016

2016_Feb4_Browsers_AWith over 1 billion worldwide users and a market share of over 50%, it is not a stretch to say that Google Chrome is one of the best and most popular browsers available in the market. Its speed far outstrips that of most other browsers. But despite being the fastest web browser, it’s often criticized by users for occasional sluggishness and crashes. Is your Chrome slowing down your PC or browser experience? In this article, we’ll show you how to speed up the performance of your Chrome by using these simple tricks.

Disable extensions

Extensions are basically small programs that you can download from the Chrome Web Store to add more features and functionality to your Chrome. While certain extensions are very useful (like AdBlock and Evernote) if you have too many installed, Chrome’s speed may suffer from processing all of these extensions at once.

Most extensions will show on Chrome’s address bar, and you can quickly uninstall them by right-clicking on the button and selecting “Uninstall”. You can also navigate to the hamburger icon on the toolbar, select “More tools” and then “Extensions”. From there you’ll find a list of extensions that may have been inadvertently installed by a user. Simply uncheck the “Enabled” box for the ones you don’t need.

Disable plugins

When you first install Google Chrome, some unnecessary plugins are also installed and enabled by default. Over the course of your web browsing session, you may even add more plugins to Chrome without knowing. As with extensions, you can disable plugins that are not in use. Simply type chrome:plugins into the address bar and press Enter. Note that plugins can only be disabled, not uninstalled. We recommend you keep the Adobe Flash Player plugin enabled, since many websites today use Flash to display menus and videos.

Clear browsing data

Chrome has a cache database that collects URLs of the websites you’ve visited, your download history, and cookies. While the purpose of this feature is to speed up your computer by caching data instead of loading it again every time, sometimes the browsing history can get bloated with hundreds and thousands of websites you’ve previously visited. Luckily there’s a quick fix: enter chrome://history in the address bar and hit Enter. Select “Clear browsing data” and select the items you wish to delete and choose a time range from the drop-down list. Click “Clear browsing data” again to remove the selected data.

Use the Clean up Tool

In some cases the speed of your Chrome may be affected by the software installed on your computer. Google has released its very own application that will scan and remove any software that may conflict with Chrome. You can check out the Chrome Cleanup Tool here. All you need to do is download and run the application, and sit back while the program scans your PC. The app is very helpful if you’ve tried the above tips but your Chrome continues to be sluggish.

Web browsers are indispensable tools for your business. You and your employees use them everyday to check emails, research information, get work done, manage social media accounts, and more. If the browser you’re using is not performing up to your expectations, contact us today and we’ll get to the root of the problem and fix it.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Browsers
January 12th, 2016

Browsers_Nov25_AEven if you’re not currently taking adequate steps to protect yourself (and your company!) when you’re using the Internet, deep down you know you should be. Or maybe you already think you have enough precautions in place – but can you ever be too careful? In these times of Internet fraud, phishing scams and high profile hacks, there has never been a better time to take another look at your online safety. The big question is, where do you start?

Keeping your data safe is crucial for any small to medium-sized business. Back in the good old days when paperwork, ring binders and print outs were the norm, you wouldn’t have dreamed of leaving classified data lying around for all and sundry to see. Imagine the furor if you left a list of employee salaries lying face up on a desk. Think of the damage an employee with a grudge could do if they were able to flip through private files whenever they pleased. Now, just because your data is stored on your computers, servers and in the cloud, that doesn’t make it impenetrable. If anything it makes it available to absolutely anyone, anywhere, who has the desire and capabilities to hack into your system.

One thing you should be doing to protect your data – and your company – is to make use of privacy-protecting browser extensions. Depending on the nature of your business, both you and your employees are likely to be online at least some, if not all, of the working day. And that makes you vulnerable to attack. But what are some of the browser extensions that are out there?

Prevent browser tracking

If you don’t like the idea of a third party (reputable or otherwise) being able to track your browsing habits, try installing a tool which offers private browsing. These programs offer protection against tracking by blocking third party cookies as well as malware. Some extensions also boast secure Wi-Fi and bandwidth optimization and can guard against tracking and data collection from social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook or Google+.

Blocking adverts

While online ads may seem harmless, the truth is that they can contain scripts and widgets that might send your data back to a third party. A decent ad blocking program will block banner, rollover and pop-up ads, and also prevent you from inadvertently visiting a site that is known to contain malware. Many blockers contain additional features such as the ability to disable cookies and scripts used by third-parties on a site, the option to block specific items, and even ‘clean up’ Facebook, and hide YouTube comments. The major blockers work with Google Chrome, Safari and Firefox and you’ll be able to find everything from user-friendly solutions to more advanced tools that are customizable down to the tiniest degree. Do be aware, however, that not configuring your ad blocker properly can cause websites to ‘break’, making them unusable.

Consider installing a VPN

Unfortunately browser tracking, malware and adware are not the only Internet nasties that you need to be concerned about, but the good news is that there a number of other extensions that you can download to really get a grip on your online safety. A VPN (Virtual Private Network) is something else to consider. VPNs encrypt your Internet traffic, effectively shutting out anyone who may be trying to see what you’re doing. Commonly used in countries such as China where the Internet is heavily censored by the powers that be, a VPN allows for private browsing as well as enabling users to access blocked sites – in China’s case that’s anything from blogs criticizing the government to Facebook and Instagram. There are a huge number of VPNs on the market so do a little research and find one that suits you best.

Finally, it goes without saying that having anti-virus and anti-malware software installed on your PC, tablet and even your smartphone is crucial if you want to ensure your online safety.

If you’d like to know more about staying safe on the Internet or would like to schedule a security assessment for your company, get in touch with us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Browsers
October 10th, 2015

Browsers_Oct8_AProtecting your privacy online is crucial in today’s world to avoid data breaches, malware attacks, and other mischief hackers can throw your way. The easiest way to do this is through browser extensions, but the question is which is best? Here, we’ll take a look at the most popular browser extensions that promise to protect your online privacy.

AdBlock Plus (Chrome/Firefox/Safari)

AdBlock Plus blocks ads, scripts and popups on your browser. It kills third-party scripts and widgets that send your data to who-knows-where. Be careful you use it properly, the extension can break the sites you read, which is why you have to first figure out what to allow and what to block. AdBlock Plus also stops you from visiting known malware-hosting domains, and it allows power users to play with different subscription lists while basic users can just enable it and walk away. Best of all, it is completely free.

Disconnect (Chrome/Firefox/Safari)

Disconnect Private Browsing protects you from tracking, malware and malvertising while offering secure Wi-Fi and bandwidth optimization features. Third party tracking cookies become a thing of the past, and you can enjoy total control over all site scripts and elements from a user-friendly toolbar menu. You’re completely guarded from ads injected by malware or ad networks that are hijacked by embedded malware.

Disconnect also protects you from tracking by social networks like Facebook, Twitter and Google, which use your browsing experience even when off-site in order to collect data about you. What’s more, you’ll never have to worry about sidejacking, which is where an attacker uses stolen cookies to access your personal data without having to know your password. Available in free version and Premium, the main difference is that Premium adds mobile malware blocking and tracking to its arsenal, too.

HTTPS Everywhere (Chrome/Firefox/Opera)

One of the must-have tools for your browsing experience, HTTPS Everywhere shunts your connection to SSL whenever possible, and will try to find secure versions of the sites you visit. This protects your browsing experience and online privacy without you really having to do anything. Updates have also just been rolled out to keep you safe on thousands more sites around the web, and this extension is free for download.

Tunnelbear (Chrome)

This Virtual Private Network (VPN) encrypts all of your internet traffic, secures your browser data, and offers robust protection from prying eyes. Best of all, this won’t cost you a dime. Unfortunately, though, Tunnelbear is only available on Chrome at the moment; Safari and Firefox users will have to wait a little longer for this extension to come their way.

Web of Trust (Chrome/Firefox/Safari/IE)

Web of Trust (WOT) is a free extension that ranks sites by reputation and shows you whether a specific site has been known to host malware, or is loaded with tracking cookies and scripts that could wreak malware or adware havoc on your system.

If you’ve been browsing the web without any protection, or feel like your online privacy is at risk, talk to one of our experts and we’ll be happy to help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Browsers
August 27th, 2015

Browsers_Aug20_AChrome might be among the most popular web browsers around, but it’s not the only one available. Even if you’re a Google fan and swear by using Chrome when you can, chances are you use a device that either doesn’t have Chrome installed or on which you simply prefer to browse via another application. And it makes good productivity sense to have your list of internet bookmarks on hand, whichever device you’re on. That’s why this handy tip, which lets you access your Chrome bookmarks in any browser, is a useful one to keep in mind.

Whereas in the past it was possible to sync bookmarks saved in Chrome to your Google Docs account, this ceased with the transition from Google Docs to Google Drive. You can still save your bookmarks, but they are now only accessible on other devices if you use Chrome there too. Go online with Firefox or one of the other alternatives and you’ll be left without the easy bookmark access you rely on. The alternative is to use the Bookmarks Anywhere browser extension, which syncs your Chrome bookmarks to your other browsers and updates them live as you add to the list. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Within Chrome on the device that contains the bookmarks you want to sync, download the Bookmarks Anywhere extension from the Chrome Web Store.
  2. Once the extension has been added, a popup will appear. If you’re not already logged in, sign in to the Google account you use in Chrome; you’ll then need to grant Bookmarks Anywhere the browser permissions it requires.
  3. Your Chrome bookmarks will now be synced to the Bookmarks Anywhere site. To access them from non-Chrome browsers on your other devices, just sign in to www.bookmarksany.com using your Google account and a list of your bookmarks will appear. You can also manually add new bookmarks from this page, though these don’t appear to sync back to your Chrome bookmarks menu.
If you want to discover other simple ways to boost your productivity through better use of IT, give us a call and we’ll show you how.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Browsers